Home
    Committees
    Registration
    Accommodation
    Contact
Home
Welcome Note
Congress Chairpersons
Section Heads
Committees
Timetable
List of Main Topics
List of Faculty
Scientific Program
Thursday, October 13
Friday, October 14
Saturday, October 15
Sunday, October 16
Poster Presentations
Guided Poster Tour
Poster Instructions
Best Poster Award
Registration
Participants from developing countries
Invitation Letter
Accommodation
China World Hotel
Sponsorship & Exhibition
Sponsors
Current Sponsors
Past Sponsors
General Information
Before you travel ...
Entry Visas
Transportation
Tips & Hints
Partners
CONy Barcelona 2010 Webcasting
Past & Future CONY Congresses
CONy Zurich
  
The 5th World Congress on
Controversies in Neurology (CONy) - Asia Pacific
Life Course Related Conditions
Beijing, China, October 13-16, 2011
 
  Saturday, October 15 Print
   
HALL A :: STROKE
       
Stroke Section Heads Natan Bornstein, Israel & K.S. Lawrence Wong, Hong Kong
     
Session (13) 
STROKE PREVENTION
08:30-10:30 
 
Chairpersons: 
Stephen Davis, Australia; Wei Wei Zhang, China
 
Capsule: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major risk factor for cardio-embolic stroke.  Coumadin was proven to reduce the risk of stroke by about 62%.  However only 1/3 of patients with AF are actually taking coumadin and of them, only 50% are actually achieving therapeutic INR.  Recent clinical trials have shown that new anticoagulants are at least equally effective with no need for monitoring blood levels.  Will coumadin disappear to be replaced by these new, more expensive drugs?
08:30-09:30 
Debate: Atrial fibrillation and stroke prevention – Is warfarin still an option?
Yes: David Spence, Canada
No: Lakshmi Ranganathan, India
Commentator: Derk Krieger, Denmark
   
Capsule: Aspirin is the most used antiplatelet for secondary stroke prevention.  However, aspirin reduces the risk of recurrent stroke by only 20%.  Severl ex vivo tests have shown that up to 40% of patients on aspirin are "aspirin-resistant" but the clinical relevance of this phenomenon is still debated and the use of ex vivo tests routinely is still widely controversial
09:30-10:30  
Debate: Should aspirin-resistance be routinely applied to tailor stroke prevention?
Yes: Natan Bornstein, Israel
No: David Spence, Canada
Commentator: Bella Gross, Israel  
 
10:30-11:00 
Coffee Break  
 
Session (14) IMAGING
11:00-13:00 
Chairpersons: 
Qiang Dong, China; Lipeng Lui, China
  
Capsule: The new definition of transient ischemic attack (TIA) requires neuro-imaging with no evidence of brain infarct.  DWI-MRI is the most accurate tool to detect brain infarcts even in the very early stages.  This raises the question on whether or not DWI-MRI should be performed on every TIA patient in order to identify potential brain infarction
11:00-12:00 
Debate: Acute MRI should be performed on all TIA patients
Yes: Mark Parsons, Australia  
No: Ashfaq Shuaib, Canada
Commentator: Stephen Davis, Australia 
 
Capsule: In our routine practice, we often encounter ischemic stroke patients with previous history of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH).  This raises the dilemma of using antithrombotic therapy in these patients for secondary stroke prevention
12:00-13:00 
Debate: Antithrombotic therapy in patients with recent cerebral ischemia and history of ICH: To start or not to start?
To start: Bella Gross, Israel 
Not always: Laszlo Csiba, Hungary
    
13:00-14:00  
Lunch Break 
 
Session (15)  STROKE THERAPY: TO STENT OR NOT?
14:00-16:00 
Chairpersons:
Shun Wei Li, China; Chengwei Liu, China
 
Capsule: Symptomatic intracranial artery stenosis is more frequent than previously thought and carriers a high risk for stroke.  Antithrombotic therapy or alternatively stent insertion can be used in this condition
14:00-15:00  
Debate: What is the best therapy for symptomatic intracranial artery stenosis?
Medical therapy: Lui Ming, China
Endovascular treatment (stenting): Michal Bar, Czech Republic
Commentator: K.S. Lawrence Wong, Hong Kong
     
Capsule: For many years the cardiologists introduced stenting as the treatment of choice for acute myocardial infarction (AMI).  The endovascular approach for AIS therapy is inconclusive and no randomized, controlled studies have proven its superiority over IV tPA.  Despite this, the endovascular therapy for AIS is gaining popularity and is widely used
15:00-16:00 
Debate: Should endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke be used routinely in clinical practice?
Yes: Ken Butcher, Canada
No: K.S. Lawrence Wong, Hong Kong
Commentator: Mark Parsons, Australia
 
16:00-16:30  
Coffee Break
   
Session (16) DIAGNOSTIC TOOLS IN STROKE
16:30-18:30  
Chairpersons: 
Joanna Wojczal, Poland; K.S. Lawrence Wong, Hong Kong
 
Capsule: Carotid stenosis accounts for 15-20% of all ischemic strokes.  The management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACAS) is still controversial.  Plaque vulnerabililty may identify high risk ACAS subjects in whom intervention might be justified
16:30-17:30 
Debate: Asymptomatic carotid stenosis: Are the current tools sufficient to identify the vulnerable plaque? 
Yes: Manfred Kaps, Germany

No: Laszlo Csiba, Hungary
Commentator: Natan Bornstein, Israel
  
Capsule: Based on the current protocols for IV tPA therapy, only CT-scan is required to identify patients who are eligible for thrombolysis.  However it is suggested that the use of MRI could extend the therapeutic window but its use worldwide is still limited
17:30-18:30 
Debate: Non-contrast CT is sufficient for the primary assessment of acute stroke
To start: Ashfaq Shuaib, Canada
It depends on the etiology: Stephen Davis, Australia  
Commentator: Mark Parsons, Australia
   
HALL B :: EPILEPSY
         
Epilepsy Section Heads Alla Guekht, Russia & Michael Sperling, USA
      
Session (17) 
EPILEPSY THERAPY EVALUATION
08:30-10:30 
 
Chairpersons: 
Senyang Lang, China; Maria Mazurkiewicz-Beldzinska, Poland
 
Capsule: Whether formal treatment guidelines serve a useful purpose is questionable.  The relevance of investigational studies conducted in specific patient cohorts to the general population, and the clinical relevance of trial endpoints, such as seizure control and side effects, is subject to debate.  This debate will address these issues
08:30-09:30 
Debate: Evidence-based guidelines are useful in treating epilepsy
Yes: Ettore Beghi, Italy
No: Torbjorn Tomson, Sweden
Commentator: Nandan Yardi, India
    
Capsule: The use of antiepileptic drugs may be associated with an increased risk of suicidal behavior.  As a consequence, the FDA has issued a warning regarding the use of these agents.  However, other analyses question the risks of these agents in provoking suicide
09:30-10:30  
Debate: Antiepileptic drugs increase the risk of suicide
Pro: William Theodore, USA
Con: Michael Sperling, USA 
Commentator: Alla Guekht, Russia
    
10:30-11:00 
Coffee Break  
 
Session (18) EPILEPSY, OLD AND NEW
11:00-13:00 
Chairpersons: 
Niklas Mattsson, Sweden; Konrad Rejdak, Poland
  
Capsule: Phenobarbital is the least expensive antiepileptic agent, yet has been associated with a range of deleterious side effects.  Whether the side effect profile has been exaggerated or not is subject for debate.  Given the pressing global need for affordable therapy, are the side affects sufficiently modest for this agent to regain a position as a reasonable first choice for treating epilepsy?
11:00-12:00 
Debate: Phenobarbital should be a first-line agent for the treatment in epilepsy
Yes: Umaiorubahan Meenakshisundaram, India
No: William Theodore, USA
Commentator: Jera Kruja, Albania
  
Capsule: Epilepsy surgery is most effective for patients with established structural lesions, and the benefit of surgery has been questioned in patients without such lesions.  On the other hand, uncontrolled epilepsy has significant morbidity.  Do the merits of surgery for non-lesional epilepsy outweigh the negatives?
12:00-13:00 
Debate: Epilepsy surgery should be offered early even to patients with non-lesional MRI scans
Yes: Michael Sperling, Italy
No: Ettore Beghi, Italy
Commentator: Sang-Kun Lee, Korea
   
13:00-14:00  
Lunch Break 
 
Session (19)  EPILEPSY THERAPY AND RISKS
14:00-16:00 
Chairpersons:
Betul Baykan, Turkey; Hadassa Goldberg-Stern, Israel
   
Capsule: Some patients with epilepsy have an increased risk of dying as a consequence of their epilepsy.  Is there value to informing patients of this risk, and if so under which circumstances?  What is the ethical responsibility of the physician?
14:00-15:00  
Debate: Epilepsy patients and their families should routinely be told about the risk of SUDEP
Yes: Torbjorn Tomson, Sweden
No: Manjari Tripathi, India
Commentator: Jera Kruja, Albania
     
Capsule: The 50% responder rate is used as a standard by the FDA to assess efficacy of new antiepileptic drugs.  Is this a reasonable and appropriate standard?  Does it have clinical relevance?
15:00-16:00 
Debate: A 50% reduction in seizure frequency is a useful measure to assess treatment response in epilepsy
Yes: Alla Guekht, Russia
No:
Sang-Kun Lee, Korea
Commentator: William Theodore, USA
 
16:00-16:30  
Coffee Break
   
Session (20) CHINESE TRADITIONAL MEDICIN; CASE PRESENTATIONS
16:30-18:30  
Capsule: Various medicinal agents and non-medicinal treatments have been employed to treat epilepsy.  This lecture will review the role of traditional medical approaches in treating epilepsy
Chairpersons: 
Vladimir Donath, Slovakia; Jian Zheng, China
 
16:30-16:45 
Lecture: Treatment of epilepsy in Chinese traditional medicine:
   
16:45-18:30 
Discussion of challenging cases by an expert panel
A series of challenging cases will be presented to course faculty for discussion of diagnosis and management
Presenter: Michael Sperling, USA
Panel:
Ettore Beghi, Italy
Alla Guekht, Russia
Jera Kruja, Albania
Sang-Kun Lee, Korea
Shi Chuo Li, China 
William Theodore, USA
Torbjorn Tomson, Sweden
Manjari Tripathi, India 
Nandan Yardi, India
         
 HALL C :: DEMENTIA & BIOMARKERS
         
Dementia Section Heads Roger Bullock, UK & Lea Grinberg, USA
      
Session (21) 
WHAT IS ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE (AD)?
08:30-10:30 
 
Capsule: Alzheimer's disease (AD) has evolved from a rare pre-senile dementia to one of the most feared conditions affecting people over 65 years.  However, despite all the advances in the knowledge about this disease, its definition and histopathological hallmarks are not very different from those used by Alzheimer himself.  And worse, no treatment is available.  Perhaps, the whole concept of the disease has to be reviewed in order to achieve progress in prevention and therapeutics.  This session will examine the most accepted concept of AD and discuss new evidence that can help us to re-think how we see this disease(s)
Chairpersons: 
Lea Grinberg, USA; Huali Wang, China 
     
08:30-09:30 
Debate: Alzheimer's is a psychiatric not a neurological disorder
Yes: Johannes Thome, UK
No: Bogdan O. Popescu, Romania
Commentator: Panteleimon Giannakopoulos, Switzerland 
      
09:30-10:30  
Debate: AD research has run out of ideas
True: Roger Bullock, UK
False: Michael Krams, USA
Commentator: Johannes Thome, UK
    
10:30-11:00 
Coffee Break  
 
Session (22) NEW THERAPIES FOR AD
11:00-13:00 
Chairpersons: 
Jing Gao, China; Weiping Wu, China
    
Capsule: Animal models are widely used for drug development in neurodegenerative diseases.  This debate will focus on the pros and limitations of using animal models, including the advancements and failures achieved to date
11:00-12:00 
Debate: Are animal models useful for drug development in diseases with relatively unexplored etiopathogenesis?
Yes: Manfred Windisch, Austria
No: Bogdan O. Popescu, Romania
Commentator: Michael Krams, USA
   
Capsule: The amyloid hypothesis has dominated the AD field for over 20 years.  However, all the research addressing this hypothesis resulted in meager therapeutic advance to date.  Are we ready to refute the amyloid hypothesis and focus on alternatives?  This debate will address the current knowledge about the role of amyloid in AD pathogenesis, the novel amyloid-targeted drug trials and past failures 
12:00-13:00 
Debate: Is amyloid targeting really the answer in AD?
Yes: Lea Grinberg, USA
No: Panteleimon Giannakopoulos, Switzerland
Commentator: Manfred Windisch, Austria
  
13:00-14:00  
Lunch Break 
 
Session (23)  EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF DEMENTIA
14:00-16:00 
Capsule:
Evaluation of drug therapy relies heavily on neuropsychological measurement conducted across multiple sites. The increasing complexity of AD trials means new centers are being created all the time. This leads to two key methodological issues, which are very important when looking for changes in the rate of decline in AD. Firstly, the control of variance across multiple sites, especially when some of the measures are quite subjective; secondly, are the tests measuring what we think and are they good enough to diagnose what we want and predict change over time. This session explores these issues and will hopefully generate new suggestions around trial design.
Also, recent studies have suggested that cholinesterase inhibitors should be given at even higher dosage, but this is still not widely accepted
Chairpersons:
Yueqin Huang, China; Yan Sheng Li, China
 
14:00-14:40  
Debate: Centralized rating is the only way to make the ADAS-cog reliable as a primary outcome
Yes: Roger Bullock, UK 
No: Terese Treves, Israel 
    
14:40-15:20 
Debate: Are neuropsychological tests really helpful in diagnosing dementia?
Yes: Keith Wesnes, UK
No:  John Harrison, UK 
    
15:20-16:00
Debate: Conventional dosage of acetyl-cholinesterase inhibitors to AD is adequate
Yes: Wen-Shi Wei, China
No: Yuan-Han Yang, Taiwan
 
16:00-16:30  
Coffee Break
   
Session (24) BIOMARKERS IN NEUROLOGICAL DISEASES: ARE WE ON THE RIGHT TRACK YET?
16:30-18:30  
Capsule: The search for CNS biomarkers to combat today's most prevalent neurological diseases are reaching a fevered pitch.  With many new innovative strategies to utilize them, such as their uses in diagnostic assay platforms, as intermediate surrogate endpoints and as therapeutics themselves, biomarker discovery and development provide multiple opportunities for early diagnosis of neurological disorders.  This session presents current known biomarkers.  We will shall and gain insight into clinically applied biomarkers which can be used as screening tools and for accelerating drug discovery.  We also present how these biomarkers can be incorporated into clinical drug trials, translational medicine and be used to elucidate mechanisms of disease and drug action
Chairpersons: 
Fredrik Ponten, Sweden; Rivka Ravid, The Netherlands
 
16:30-16:40  The use of biomarkers in neurological drug development:
Tony Ho, USA
  
16:40-16:50 
Niklas Mattsson, Sweden  
   
16:50-17:00
Imaging biomarkers in neurology:
David Leppert, Switzerland
     
17:00-17:10 Modulation of FGF-2 expression in astrocytes via dopamine receptor signaling: Potential implications for diagnostics and treatment for PD
Jiawei Zhou, China
   
17:10-17:20 
Do we need biomarkers in epilepsy?
Konrad Rejdak, Poland
      
17:20-17:30
   
17:30-17:40
17:40-17:50
17:50-18:00
18:00-18:30 
Discussion
     
    

Home   
 
Copyright © 2007 comtecmed.com. All rights reserved.   The website was last updated on 06/24/2012 Created by     WebStudio.co.il