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Scientific Program

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Thursday, May 8th
17:30-19:15 Opening Session
Chairpersons:
Amos D. Korczyn, Israel; Heinz Reichmann, Germany
17:30-17:45
Opening remarks
17:45-18:15 Lecture: Neuroscience and neuroscientists in Berlin
Capsule: Several neurodegenerative diseases cannot be diagnosed clinically at the early stages without the use of biomarkers. MRI is very useful in diagnosing multiple sclerosis, NMO, vascular dementia and many others. New data show typical changes in many ALS patients, but can these be used as biomarkers or can they tell us how the disease spreads?
18:15-19:00 Debate: Imaging is a promising biomarker of ALS
18:15-18:30
18:30-18:45
18:45-19:00
19:00-19:15
Discussion
Commentator: Amos D. Korczyn, Israel
 
19:15 Welcome Reception 

Friday, May 9th
Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
Section Heads - Mark Freedman, Canada & Friedemann Paul, Germany
07:30-08:15
Guided E-poster tour #1 - Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
Tour Guides: Vesna Brinar, Croatia; Sámuel Komoly, Hungary
Session 1 Stress and fatigue in MS
08:30-10:30
 
Chairpersons:
Sámuel Komoly, Hungary; Jera Kruja, Albania
Capsule: It has long been debated whether or not "stress” can exacerbate an underlying autoimmune disease through connections between the CNS and the immune system, but what is the hard evidence that this occurs? Stress means different things to different people. Would avoiding stress lower attack rates?
Do the current disease modifying agents protect from "stress-induced” exacerbations?
08:30-09:30
Debate: Does "stress" trigger MS attacks?
08:30-08:40
08:40-09:00
09:00-09:20
09:20-09:30
Debate host: Sven Schippling, Switzerland
Yes: Pasquale Calabrese, Switzerland
No: Hayrettin Tumani, Germany
Discussion
 
Capsule: Fatigue is a frequent MS symptom that is perceived by one third of patients as their most burdensome symptom and accounts for premature retirement. Our understanding of pathophysiology, objective measurement and treatment options is sparse. Recently, an association of fatigue with sleep disorders was reported suggesting that treatment of an underlying sleep disturbance may improve fatigue. How strong is the evidence for this? Should every MS patient with fatigue be investigated in a sleep lab?
09:30-10:30 Debate: Does MS related fatigue reflect a sleep disorder?
09:30-09:40
09:40-10:00
10:00-10:20
10:20-10:30
Debate host: Iris-Katharina Penner, Switzerland
Yes: Friedemann Paul, Germany
No: Cris Constantinescu, UK
Discussion
 
10:30-11:00
Coffee Break
Session 2 Unconventional therapies in MS
11:00-13:00
 
Chairpersons:
Wolfgang Brück, Germany; Friedemann Paul, Germany
Capsule: The unique geographical distribution of MS has been known for decades, yet it was not clear why people residing in equatorial areas are relatively protected. It has recently been suggested that the relevant factor is sun exposure, operating through vitamin D synthesis. Certain genetic findings support this hypothesis, leading to a recommendation to treat MS patients with vitamin D supplementation
11:00-12:00 Debate: Vitamin D a relevant factor in MS?
11:00-11:15
11:15-11:30
11:30-11:45
11:45-12:00
Debate host: Sven Schippling, Switzerland
Yes: Eva Havrdova, Czech Republic
No: Ralf Linker, Germany
Discussion
 
Capsule: From time to time, mass media and patient organizations report miraculous healings of severe and desperate MS by stem cell transplantation. Until recently, cell-based therapies had a dubious reputation in the MS scientific community because of the high treatment related mortality. However, since this has substantially decreased with modified protocols, research on cell-based therapies has experienced a revival. But how convincing is the evidence? If we believe that this approach may be one out of many options, how can we identify suitable patients who will have maximal benefit at lowest risks?
12:00-13:00 Debate: Cell-based therapies hold particular promise for treating MS
12:00-12:10
12:10-12:30
12:30-12:50
12:50-13:00
Debate host: Mark Freedman, Canada
Yes: Antonio Uccelli, Italy
Discussion
 
13:00-13:45
Lunch Break
13:00-13:45
Industry-Supported Meet the Expert - Lunch session
Pre-registration to this session is required
Click here for the full meet the expert
 
13:45-14:30
Are we able to treat MS correctly?
Industry-Supoprted Plenary Symposium
Chairperson: Hans-Peter Hartung, Germany
Ralf Linker, Germany
Sven Meuth, Germany
14:30-14:45
Break
Session 3 MS Treatment: What are the limits?
14:45-16:45
 
Chairpersons:
Nikolaos Grigoriadis, Greece; Eva Havrdova, Czech Republic
Capsule: Natalizumab is a very efficacious drug in active MS. However, although rare, progressive multifocal lencoencephalopathy (PML) is a potentially life-threatening complication. Recent risk stratification algorithms that include duration of treatment, pre-treatment with immunosuppressants and JC virus serostatus have been proposed to improve risk assessment in the individual patient. Can we rely on these parameters to decide on commencing, continuing or discontinuing treatment?
14:45-15:45 Debate: JCV serostatus is a reliable and clinically meaningful biomarker to contain PML risk during natalizumab therapy
14:45-14:55
14:55-15:15
15:15-15:35
15:35:15-45
Debate host: Olaf Stüve, USA
Yes: Krzysztof Selmaj, Poland
No: Hans-Peter Hartung, Germany
Discussion
 
Capsule: Despite all efforts to contain inflammatory events in MS we see evidence of irreversible disability along with axonal and neuronal loss. However some of these changes might be amenable to prevention or even reversal. Could there also be endogenous protection and repair mechanisms that can be better understood in order to exploit them for therapeutic purposes?
15:45-16:45 Debate: Regeneration and remyelination are possible in MS lesions
15:45-15:05
15:05-16:15
16:15-16:35
16:35-16:45
Debate host: Robert Zivadinov, USA
Yes: Wolfgang Brück, Germany
No: Friedemann Paul, Germany
Discussion
 
16:45-17:15
Coffee Break
Session 4 The MRI in MS: Uses and limitations
17:15-19:15
 
Chairpersons:
Vesna Brinar, Croatia; Jens Wuerfel, Germany
Capsule: We live in an era heavily relying on technology to tell us the truth, not only in clinical medicine. It is felt that progressive brain atrophy probably represents the accrual of irreversible neurological disability and cognitive dysfunction. But does brain atrophy, as measured by brain tissue volumetrics on MRI truly represent just the loss of CNS tissue? What is pseudo- or pseudo-pseudo atrophy and how to tell the difference? If a treatment does or does not affect MRI-measured atrophy, can this be correlated with clinical efficacy? Are MRI measurements of brain atrophy standardized? If so, how might a clinician utilize such data to assist in making treatment decisions?
17:15-18:15 Debate: Can we judge the efficacy of disease modifying medications based on their effects on MRI brain atrophy?
17:15-17:25
17:25-17:45
17:45-18:05
18:05-18:15
Debate host: Robert Zivadinov, USA
Yes: David Leppert, Switzerland
No: Joab Chapman, Israel replacing Prof. Montalban
Discussion
 
Capsule: A good response to therapy might be to be completely "disease activity free” (i.e. no new relapse, progression or MRI lesion) but does this represent all important outcome measures? What if despite being completely free of observable clinical and MRI activity a patient lacks the cognitive power or energy to work? What about those intangibles like fatigue, cognitive slowing or quality of life? How effectively are these other intangibles measured or judged? Is there a way of incorporating them into our treatment decisions?
18:15-19:15 Debate: Can clinical or MRI measures alone be used reliably to make treatment decisions or do we always need them both to make treatment decisions?
18:15-18:25
18:25-18:45
18:45-19:05
19:05-19:15
Debate host: Cris Constantinescu, UK
Yes: Sven Schippling, Switzerland
No: Iris-Katharina Penner, Switzerland
Discussion
 
  MS Section continues to Saturday, Session 21 ...
 
Friday, May 9th
Dementia
Section Heads - Murat Emre, Turkey & Hans Förstl, Germany
07:30-08:15
Guided E-poster tour #1 - Dementia & Alzheimer's disease (AD)
Tour Guides: Yvonne Freund-Levi, Sweden; Milica Kramberger, Slovenia
Session 5
Late onset dementia
08:30-10:30
 
Chairpersons:
Lefkos T. Middleton, UK; Roberto Monastero, Italy
08:30-09:00 Lecture: Recent developments in the genetics of late onset dementias
  Lars Bertram, Germany
 
Capsule:
Genetic studies in the 90s, resulted in the identification of pathways underlying late onset neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD, PD and its associated dementia forms of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and PD with dementia (PDD). These discoveries have led to extensive R&D efforts for disease modifying therapies that still remain elusive
09:00-09:45 Debate: 20 years of study: Aß and tau in dementia, has it been worth it?
09:00-08:15
09:15-09:30
09:30-09:45
Debate host: Murat Emre, Turkey
Yes: Lea Grinberg, USA/Brazil
No: Lefkos T. Middleton, UK
 
Capsule:
There has been a strong trend, in recent years, towards diagnostic criteria and trial endpoints of AD and its prodromal phases based on biological and imaging biomarkers. Are they superior to neuropsychological tests?
09:45-10:30 Debate: Neuropsychology tests vs. biomarkers in pre-clinical and early AD
09:45-10:00
10:00-10:15
10:15-10:30
Debate host: Yoram Barak, Israel
Pro biomarkers: Robert Perneczky, UK
Pro neuropsychological and clinical endpoints: Michael Ropacki, USA
 
10:30-11:00
Coffee Break
Session 6 Disease mechanisms in AD
11:00-13:00
 
Chairpersons:
Yvonne Fruend-Levi, Sweden; Oliver Peters, Germany
Capsule: Findings in animal models suggested that abnormal amyloid, when injected into normal brain tissue, can act as a seed, change the confirmation of the host molecules and cause propagation of the pathology. Are such prion-like mechanisms also operational in AD?
11:00-12:00 Debate: Does AD spread in a prion-like fashion?
11:00-11:15
11:15-11:30
11:30-11:45
11:45-12:00
Yes: Michael Geschwind, USA
No: Lea Grinberg, USA/Brazil
Discussion
Commentator: Kurt Jellinger, Austria
Capsule:

There is a large body of data suggesting that lifestyle choices such as nutrition, physical exercise and cognitive stimulation may influence the risk of developing dementia. Do these factors really have a causal relation to the risk of dementia or are these simply epiphenomena? Can we reduce the risk or delay the onset of dementia by large-scale implementation of right lifestyle choices?

12:00-13:00 Debate: Can lifestyle choices predict outcome in dementia?
12:00-12:15
12:15-12:30
12:30-12:45
12:45-13:00
Yes: Miia Kivipelto, Sweden
No: Panteleimon Giannakopoulos, Switzerland
Discussion
Commentator: Giancarlo Logroscino, Italy
 
13:00-13:45
Lunch Break
13:00-13:45
Industry-Supported Meet the Expert - Lunch session
Pre-registration to this session is required
Click here for the full meet the expert
 
13:45-14:30
Industry-Supported Plenary Symposium, Hall A
14:30-14:45
Break
Session 7 Non-cognitive symptoms in dementia
14:45-16:45
 
Chairpersons:
Ezio Giacobini, Switzerland; Martin Hofmann-Apitius, Germany
Capusle: Many patients with AD suffer from depression and still others display the existence of affective symptoms prior to the appearance of cognitive decline. However, depressive manifestations are common in the general population. Can depression be an early manifestation of the neurodegenerative process?
14:45-15:45 Debate: Is late-onset depression prodromal neurodegeneration?
14:45-15:00
15:00-15:15
15:15-15:30
15:30-15:45
Yes: Steffi Riedel-Heller, Germany
No: Kurt Jellinger, Austria
Discussion
Commentator: Uwe Walter, Germany
 
Capsule: Once disease modifying drugs become available, they should be used at the earliest stages of the disease. However, the clinical diagnosis of AD is particularly difficult at the early stages. The availability of biomarkers is a step forward, but is it enough?
15:45-16:45 Debate: Prodromal AD – how reliable is the diagnosis? Are we ready to start clinical trials?
15:45-16:00
16:00-16:15
16:15-16:30
16:30-16:45
No: Miia Kivipelto, Sweden
Discussion
Commentator: Marwan N. Sabbagh, USA
 
16:45-17:15
Coffee Break
Session 8 Therapy for advanced dementia
17:15-19:15
 
Chairpersons:
Milica Kramberger, Slovenia; Bogdan O. Popescu, Romania
Capsule:

The major studies with cholinesterase inhibitors were performed on patients with mild to moderate disease severity and the regulatory approval was for this indication. We do not have reliable data whether these drugs are also efficacious when the patient deteriorates

17:15-18:15 Debate: Should AD-approved medications be used in advanced dementia?
17:15-17:30
17:30-17:45
17:45-18:00
18:00-18:15
Yes: Michael Geschwind, USA
No: Ovidiu Bajenaru, Romania
Discussion
Commentator: Roger Bullock, UK
Capsule: Psychotic manifestations are common in advanced dementia and are being treated symptomatically with conventional antipsychotics. However their efficacy is unknown
18:15-19:15 Debate: Antipsychotics should not be prescribed in dementia patients
18:15-18:30
18:30-18:45
18:45-19:00
19:00-19:15
Yes: Lutz Frölich, Germany
No: Roger Bullock, UK
Discussion
Commentator: Panteleimon Giannakopoulos, Switzerland
 
  See Session 23 for further Dementia topics ...
 
Friday, May 9th
Parkinson's disease
Section Heads - C. Warren Olanow, USA & Claudia Trenkwalder, Germany
07:30-08:15
Guided E-poster tour #1 - Parkinson's disease, Movement disorders, Motor neuron disease and Dystonia
Tour Guides: Emmanuel Broussolle, France; Soichi Katayama, Japan
Session 9 Diagnosing Parkinson's disease (PD)
08:30-10:30
 
Chairpersons:
Emmanuel Broussolle, France; Thomas Müller, Germany
Capsule: The UK Brain Bank Criteria are still the only valid definition of PD for clinical and scientific use and include only motor criteria. In the last decade many studies have been published that show the high incidence of non-motor symptoms in early PD. This debate will discuss the need for revising the definition of PD according to those new findings
08:30-09:30 Debate: Is the traditional definition of PD still relevant?
08:30-08:45
08:45-09:00
09:00-09:15
09:15-09:30
Yes: Anthony Schapira, UK
No: Amos D. Korczyn, Israel
Discussion
Commentator: Jens Volkmann, Germany
 
Capsule: Imaging studies have proven to be of value in the diagnosis and management of PD but there remains uncertainty as to when these are to be used and specifically if MRI or dopamine imaging studies are required in all patients. This debate will discuss whether or not imaging should be routinely employed or reserved for special circumstances, as many cases can be diagnosed with a high degree of certainty without the time, inconvenience and cost of imaging
09:30-10:30 Debate: Is imaging over-used in diagnosing movement disorders?
09:30-09:45
09:45-10:00
10:00-10:15
10:15-10:30
Yes: Angelo Antonini, Italy
No: David Brooks, UK
Discussion
Commentator: Irena Rektorova, Czech Republic
 
10:30-11:00
Coffee Break
Session 10 Where does PD begin and how does it progress?
11:00-13:00
 
Chairpersons:
Leontino Battistin, Italy; Peter Riederer, Germany
Capsule: Pathologic studies demonstrate that alpha synuclein pathology extends beyond the traditional nigrostriatal dopamine system, involving neurons in the cortex, brain stem, olfactory system, spinal cord, and peripheral autonomic nervous system. This debate will consider whether alpha synuclein pathology begins in the peripheral or central nervous system
11:00-12:00 Debate: PD begins in the peripheral nervous system
11:00-11:15
11:15-11:30
11:30-11:45
11:45-12:00
Yes: Heinz Reichmann, Germany
No: Robert E. Burke, USA
Discussion
Commentator: Reinhard Dengler, Germany
 
Capsule: Some evidence suggests that PD pathology accumulates in a prion-like way. This concept suggests that pathology and neurodegeneration occur as a consequence of misfolding of alpha synuclein with the formation of toxic oligomers/aggregates. These observations suggest novel targets for neuroprotective therapies. This debate will consider the evidence suggesting that PD is a prion disorder
12:00-13:00 Debate: Is PD a prion disorder
12:00-12:15
12:15-12:30
12:30-12:45
12:45-13:00
Yes: C. Warren Olanow, USA
No: Anthony Schapira, UK
Discussion
Commentator: Robert E. Burke, USA
 
13:00-13:45
Lunch Break
13:00-13:45
Industry-Supported Meet the Expert - Lunch session
Pre-registration to this session is required
Click here for the full meet the expert
 
13:45-14:30
Industry-Supported Plenary Symposium, Hall A
14:30-14:45
Break
Session 11 PD treatment
14:45-16:45
 
Chairpersons:
Giuseppe Neri, Italy; Horst Przuntek, Germany
Capsule: While recent publication of the EARLY Stim study favors surgery in PD patients under 60, a list of parameters has been developed of how to select the best treatment for the individual PD patients in advanced disease with motor fluctuations. Apomorphine pump, duodopa pump or DBS are following fine tuning of oral dopaminergic medications. But can the patients really benefit on long-term treatment of any of these invasive treatments compared to best medical treatment? No comparative studies are available and the answers may remain expert opinions….
14:45-15:45 Debate: What is the best treatment in advanced PD?
14:45-15:00
15:00-15:15
15:15-15:30
15:30-15:45
Deep brain stimulation (DBS): Jens Volkmann, Germany
Levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel: Angelo Antonini, Italy
Apomorphine infusion: Fabrizio Stocchi, Italy
Discussion
 
Capsule: Wearing off' of oral medication and the subsequent motor fluctuations have been a significant focus of managing off periods in PD. Less attention is focused on latency of time to ON related to oral dose onset, particularly for first daily dose to combat akinesia. This has a substantial impact on quality of life for PD patients who experience more than 40 minutes delayed time to on. While apomorphine injections are helpful in this situation, they are still not widely employed
15:45-16:45
Debate: Patients with early morning akinesia should have an apomorphine injection as their first daily dose
15:45-16:00
16:00-16:15
16:15-16:30
16:30-16:45
Yes: Stuart H. Isaacson, USA
No: Claudia Trenkwalder, Germany
Discussion
Commentator: Irena Rektorova, Czech Republic
 
16:45-17:15
Coffee Break
Session 12 Drug therapies: Evaluation and implementation
17:15-19:15
 
Chairpersons:
Georg Ebersbach, Germany; Soichi Katayama, Japan
Capsule: In a 5-year, double-blind study, subjects with PD who were randomized to initial treatment with ropinirole had a significantly lower incidence of dyskinesia compared with subjects randomized to levodopa, although Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor scores were significantly more improved with levodopa. Following this trial, treatment with dopamine agonists was preferred to avoid dyskinesias. Severe motor deficits in monotherapy with dopamine agonists and the dopamine dysregulation syndrome are the consequences of this regimen especially in young patients. A lively debate whether dopamine agonists or levodopa are more appropriate initial treatments in PD
17:15-18:15 Debate: Should levodopa be the initial therapy for PD?
17:15-17:30
17:30-17:45
17:45-18:00
18:00-18:15
Yes: Fabrizio Stocchi, Italy
No: Heinz Reichmann, Germany
Discussion
Commentator: Roger Barker, UK
 
Capsule: Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that reports of safety and efficacy in open label studies are not confirmed in double blind trials. This has been particularly true for surgical interventions such as transplantation procedures and gene delivery, and could reflect placebo effect or physician bias. This debate will consider whether it is even worth performing open label studies if they cannot be relied on
18:15-19:15 Debate: Open label studies in PD are a waste of time and money
18:15-18:30
18:30-18:45
18:45-19:00
19:00-19:15
Yes: C. Warren Olanow, USA
No: Roger Barker, UK
Discussion
Commentator: Wolfgang Jost, Germany
 
Friday, May 9th
Epilepsy
Section Heads - Martin Holtkamp, Germany & Michael Sperling, USA
07:30-08:15
Guided E-poster tour #1 - Epilepsy
Tour Guides: Ettore Beghi, Italy; Vladimir Donath, Slovakia
Session 13 Epilepsy diagnosis
08:30-10:30
 
Chairpersons:
Edward Hogan, USA; Ivan Rektor, Czech Republic
Capsule: The diagnosis of epilepsy can be challenging. The etiology remains unknown in at least half of individuals who present with the condition. Recent data suggest that inflammation may play a significant role in various models of epilepsy at the subcellular level. What is the relevance in humans?
08:30-09:30 Debate: Do many presumed cryptogenic epilepsies eventually turn out to be immune-mediated?
08:30-08:45
08:45-09:00
09:00-09:15
09:15-09:30
Yes: Christian Bien, Germany
No: Ilan Blatt, Israel
Discussion
Commentator: William Theodore, USA
 
Capsule: Criteria for diagnosing epilepsy are currently under debate. Are there circumstances in which an individual with a single seizure should be considered to have epilepsy, which itself is defined as an innate propensity to have seizures?
09:30-10:30 Debate: Should epilepsy be diagnosed in a person who has only one seizure?
09:30-09:45
09:45-10:00
10:00-10:15
10:15-10:30
Yes: Ettore Beghi, Italy
No: Kristl Vonck, Belgium
Discussion
Commentator: Andreas Schulze-Bonhage, Germany
 
10:30-11:00
Coffee Break
Session 14 Counseling patients with epilepsy
11:00-13:00
 
Chairpersons:
Péter Halász, Hungary; Joanna Jedrzejczak, Poland
Capsule:
Are seizures truly random or can specific triggers enhance their probability of occurrence? Are observations that stress and sleep deprivation trigger seizures valid or biased by coincidence and the human desire to explain random events?
11:00-12:00 Debate: Do sleep deprivation and stress bring on seizures?
11:00-11:15
11:15-11:30
11:30-11:45
11:45-12:00
Yes: Manjari Tripathi, India
No: Ilan Blatt, Israel
Discussion
Commentator: Christian Bien, Germany
 
Capsule: Antiepileptic drugs (AED's) can produce changes in mood in addition to suppressing the tendency for seizures? Do the existing objective data support the contention that AED's increase suicidality?
12:00-13:00 Debate: Do AED's contribute to suicide risk in epilepsy?
12:00-12:15
12:15-12:30
12:30-12:45
12:45-13:00
Yes: Bettina Schmitz, Germany
No: Kristl Vonck, Belgium
Discussion
Commentator: Christian E. Elger, Germany
 
13:00-13:45
Lunch Break
13:00-13:45
Industry-Supported Meet the Expert - Lunch session
Pre-registration to this session is required
Click here for the full meet the expert
 
13:45-14:30
Industry-Supported Plenary Symposium, Hall A
14:30-14:45
Break
Session 15 Epilepsy treatment
14:45-16:45
 
Chairpersons:

Vladimir Donath, Slovakia; Martin Holtkamp, Germany

Capsule: Physicians typically have very specific preferences when prescribing AED's to patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy. Are these preferences justified? Are some drugs proven to have superior efficacy?
14:45-15:45 Debate: Are all AED's similar in efficacy in newly diagnosed patients with focal epilepsy?
14:45-15:00
15:00-15:15
15:15-15:30
15:30-15:45
Yes: William Theodore, USA
No: Andreas Schulze-Bonhage, Germany
Discussion
Commentator: Bettina Schmitz, Germany
 
Capsule: The ketogenic diet is typically used in children with severe epilepsy, and has been shown to provide benefit in up to half of children who use it. Should this diet also be employed for adults with refractory epilepsy?
15:45-16:45 Debate: Should the ketogenic diet be advised for adults?
15:45-16:00
16:00-16:15
16:15-16:30
16:30-16:45
Yes: Ilan Blatt, Israel abstract by Michael Sperling
No: Elinor Ben Menachem, Sweden
Discussion
Commentator: Martin Holtkamp, Germany
 
16:45-17:15
Coffee Break
Session 16 Epilepsy prognosis
17:15-19:15
 
Chairpersons:
Konrad Rejdak, Poland; Nandan Yardi, India
Capsule:

Patients with idiopathic (genetic) generalized epilepsies are often considered to have benign a prognosis and reasonable probability of remission. Is this concept justified, or is the tendency to experience seizures lifelong?

17:15-18:15 Debate: Do patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsies require lifelong AED treatment?
17:15-17:30
17:30-17:45
17:45-18:00
18:00-18:15
Yes: Manjari Tripathi, India
No: Martin Holtkamp, Germany
Discussion
Commentator: Elinor Ben Menachem, Sweden
 
Capsule: Selective amygdalohippocampectomy is widely practiced as an alternative to anterior temporal lobectomy. Is this practice justified by either efficacy or adverse event profile?
18:15-19:15 Debate: Is selective amygdalohippocampectomy inferior to standard resection in temporal lobe epilepsy?
18:15-18:30
18:30-18:45
18:45-19:00
19:00-19:15
Yes: Ivan Rektor, Czech Republic
No: Christian E. Elger, Germany
Discussion
Commentator: Martin Holtkamp, Germany
 
Saturday, May 10th
Stroke
Section Heads - Natan Bornstein, Israel & Hans-Christoph Diener, Germany
07:00-07:45
Guided E-poster tour #2 - Stroke and Neuro-ophthalmology
Tour Guides: Michal Bar, Czech Republic; Daniel Bereczki, Hungary 
Session 17
Management of intracranial vascular pathology
08:00-10:00
 
Chairpersons:

Natan Bornstein, Israel;  Joanna Wojczal, Poland

Capsule:
Thrombectomy is promoted for younger patients with severe strokes and occlusion of the distal ICA or the proximal MCA. Three recently reported trials comparing bridging with rt-PA followed by thrombectomy vs. best medical treatment failed to show superiority. This could, however, be due to a too long time interval between event and recanalization and use of outdated devices with moderate recanalization rates
08:00-09:00
Debate: Is thrombectomy an effective therapy for acute stroke?
08:00-08:15
08:15-08:30
08:30-08:45
08:45-09:00
Yes: Matthias Endres, Germany
No: Louis Caplan, USA
Discussion
Commentator: M. Rajappa Sivakumar, India
 
Capsule: Until now there is no approved effective treatment for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). RCTs on surgical and medical treatment for ICH failed to show beneficial effect. Hemostatic therapy might be the most effective approach in reducing hematoma expansion and size
09:00-10:00
Debate: Is hemostatic therapy the most promising treatment option for ICH?
09:00-09:15
09:15-09:30
09:30-09:45
09:45-10:00
Yes: Daniel Bereczki, Hungary
No: Thorsten Steiner, Germany
Discussion
Commentator: László Csiba, Hungary
 
10:00-10:30
Coffee Break
Session 18
Acute stroke management
10:30-12:30
 
Chairpersons:
Judit Málly, Hungary; Jorge Villacura, Chile
Capsule:
A certain number of patients below the age of 60 years with cryptogenic stroke might have silent paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Long term ECG recording even with implantable devices might identify these patients. Another approach is to treat patients with cryptogenic stroke with novel anticoagulants. In patients with atrial fibrillation apixaban was superior to aspirin and had a similar risk of major bleeds
10:30-11:30 Debate: Cryptogenic stroke: Immediate anticoagulation or long-term ECG recording?
10:30-10:45
10:45-11:00
11:00-11:15
11:15-11:30
Immediate anticoagulation: Hans-Christoph Diener, Germany
Long-term ECG recording: Tommaso Sanna, Italy
Discussion
Commentator: Ashfaq Shuaib, Canada
 
Capsule: Atrial fibrillation(AF) is a major cause of cardio-embolic stroke. Primary and secondary stroke prevention in patients with AF is essential. Anticoagulants were proven to be the drugs of choice for stroke prevention in AF. However, the implementation and the wide use of Cumadin, the good old anticoagulant, encountered several obstacles. Recently, new anticoagulants became available that may change the landscape of stroke prevention in AF. This debate will discuss the important issue of stroke prevention in AF-associated stroke
11:30-12:30 Debate: Stroke prevention after AF-associated stroke
11:30-11:45
11:45-12:00
12:00-12:15
12:15-12:30
How good are we in preventing stroke in AF patients: Werner Hacke, Germany
Open questions with the new anticoagulants: Hans-Christoph Diener, Germany Discussion
Commentator: Natan Bornstein, Israel
 
12:30-12:45 Break
 
12:45-13:45
Plenary lectures
12:45-13:10
13:10-13:15
Stroke treatment, 2014
Werner Hacke, Germany
Discussion
13:15-13:40
13:40-13:45
Personalized treatment of neurological diseases
Discussion
13:45-14:45
Lunch Break
13:45-14:45
Industry-Supported Meet the Expert - Lunch session
Pre-registration to this session is required
Click here for the full meet the expert
 
Session 19
Stroke: Acute and chronic treatment
14:45-16:45
 
Chairpersons:
Jan Sobesky, Germany; Christian Weimar, Germany
Capsule:
Intracranial artery stenosis is found more frequently than was previously thought and carries high risk for stroke and recurrent ischemic events. However, the best management of this condition is still controversial. One recent study failed to show beneficial effect of endovascular treatment when compared to best medical treatment. Nevertheless, many clinicians debate the design and the interpretation of the results of this single study. To stent or not to stent? This is the question when facing intracranial artery stenosis which will be discussed in this interesting debate
14:45-15:45
Debate: Intracranial artery stenosis: Medical vs. endovascular (stent) treatment
14:45-15:00
15:00-15:15
15:15-15:30
15:30-15:45
Medical: Patrik Michel, Switzerland
Endovascular: Marius Hartmann, Germany
Discussion
Commentator: Louis Caplan, USA
 
Capsule:

No neuroprotective compound was proven to be beneficial in acute ischemic stroke.
Recovery of the brain after stroke is mainly dependent on the endogenous mechanism and brain plasticity, and neurogenesis. Recently, studies using brain stimulation have shown some promising results in enhancing brain recovery after stroke. The mechanism and potentials of this approach will be discussed

15:45-16:45
Debate: Is transcranial magnetic brain stimulation effective in improving recovery after stroke?
15:45-16:00
16:00-16:15
16:15-16:30
16:30-16:45
Yes: Dieter Heiss, Germany
No: John C. Rothwell, UK
Discussion
Commentator: Judit Málly, Hungary
 
16:45-17:15
Coffee Break
Session 20
Secondary stroke prevention
17:15-19:15
 
Chairpersons:
Michal Bar, Czech Republic; Agnieszka Slowik, Poland
Capsule:
Several RCT's of secondary stroke prevention, using dual antiplatelet agents vs. monotherapy, have shown a significant high risk of major bleeding and no additional beneficial effect of the dual antiplatelet regime. However, it was shown that the bleeding usually occur after 3-6 month of using antiplatelets.
Whether short term use of dual antiplatelet after TIA or minor stroke might be beneficial is still debatable and under investigation
17:15-18:15
Debate: Dual or mono antipatelet early after TIA or minor stroke?
17:15-17:30
17:30-17:45
17:45-18:00
18:00-18:15
Dual: Jonathan Streifler, Israel
Mono: Christian Weimar, Germany
Discussion
Commentator: Ashfaq Shuaib, Canada
Capsule: CABG carries 1- 4% risk of stroke. Significant carotid stenosis might increase the risk of stroke during CABG. Nevertheless, there is no evidence based medicine (EBM) guideline regarding the management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACAS) prior to CABG. Should preventive carotid intervention be done or not?
18:15-19:15
Debate: Asymptomatic carotid reconstruction before CABG – Yes or no?
18:15-18:30
18:30-18:45
18:45-19:00
19:00-19:15
Yes: Christian Weimar, Germany
No: László Csiba, Hungary
Discussion
Commentator: Jonathan Streifler, Israel
 
19:15 Poster Awards & Closing Ceremony
Chairpersons: Amos D. Korczyn, Israel; Heinz Reichmann, Germany; László Vécsei, Hungary
 
Saturday, May 10th
MS/Neuro-immunology/ Dementia/Movement disorders (MD)
MS Section Heads - Mark Freedman, Canada & Friedemann Paul, Germany
Neuro-immunology Section Heads: Hans-Peter Hartung, Germany & Jacek Losy, Poland
Dementia Section Heads - Murat Emre, Turkey & Hans Förstl, Germany
PD/MD Section Heads - C. Warren Olanow, USA & Claudia Trenkwalder, Germany
07:00-07:45
Guided E-poster tour #2 - Neuro-immunology and Autoimmune disease
Tour Guides: Joab Chapman, Israel; Hayrettin Tumani, Germany
Session 21
Future therapies in MS
08:00-10:00
 
Chairpersons:

Ovidiu Bajenaru, Romania; Jacek Losy, Poland

Capsule:
Some newer disease-modifying therapies are promoted by pharmaceutical companies under the promising and tendentious slogan "disease-free status” or "freedom of disease activity”. But are we there yet? To be truly disease-activity free, there would have to be no evidence of relapse, progression or MRI change. Is it conceivable that any of these therapies will completely arrest all perceivable disease activity? If not, then at what point would not being disease-activity free constitute a failure forcing a treatment change? A new MRI lesion? An attack? A change in EDSS? Should clinicians truly be seeking to obtain this "disease-activity free” status to the detriment of all else?
08:00-09:00
Debate: Can we aim for a "disease-free status" with contemporary MS therapies?
08:00-08:10
08:10-08:30
08:30-08:50
08:50-09:00
Debate host: Hans-Peter Hartung, Germany
Yes: Andrew Chan, Germany
No: Brian Weinshenker, USA
Discussion
 
Capsule:
Treatment for neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is spearated into management of acute attacks and maintenance therapy to prevent recurrences. Treatment for acute NMO attacks includ steriods, plasmaheresis and intravenous immunogloulins
09:00-10:00
Debate: Should maintenance therapy in NMO as a first line involve rituximab or immunosuppressive drugs?
09:00-09:15
09:15-09:30
09:30-09:45
09:45-10:00
Rituximab: Brain Weinshenker, USA
Immunosuppressive drugs: Hans-Peter Hartung, Germany
Discussion
Commentator: Jacek Losy, Poland
 
10:00-10:30
Coffee Break
Session 22
New Players in MS
10:30-12:30
 
Chairpersons:
Friedemann Paul, Germany; Zbigniew Stelmasiak, Poland
10:30-10:45
10:45-11:00
11:00-11:15
11:15-11:30
11:30-11:45
11:45-12:00
Teriflunomide: Andrew Chan, Germany
Ocrelizumab: Mark Freedman, Canada
Alemtuzumab: Tjalf Ziemssen, Germany
Laquinimod: Krzysztof Selmaj, Poland
Dimethylfumarat: Ralf Linker, Germany
Pegylated Interferon beta 1a: Olaf Hoffmann, Germany
 
12:30-12:45 Break
12:45-13:45
Plenary lectures, Hall A
12:45-13:10
13:10-13:15
Stroke treatment, 2014
Werner Hacke, Germany
Discussion
13:15-13:40
13:40-13:45
Personalized treatment of neurological diseases
Discussion
13:45-14:45
Lunch Break
13:45-14:45
Industry-Supported Meet the Expert - Lunch session
Pre-registration to this session is required
Click here for the full meet the expert
 
Session 23
Chasing and tracing amyloid
14:45-16:45
 
Chairpersons:
Edson Amaro Jr., Brazil; Stavros Baloyannis, Greece
Capsule:
The amyloid cascade hypothesis has been long proposed as the main pathophysiological process in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Yet all amyloid-based treatment approaches until now have failed, causing a great disappointment in the field. Have we used the wrong populations and wrong instruments? Can amyloid hypothesis still be rescued and translated into a disease-modifying treatment?
14:45-15:45
Debate: Can the amyloid hypothesis be rescued?
14:45-15:00
15:00-15:15
15:15-15:30
15:30-15:45
No: Ezio Giacobini, Switzerland
Discussion
Commentator: Murat Emre, Turkey
 
Capusle:
In vivo visualization of amyloid plaques using PiB PET has been possible for more than a decade. The practical use of PiB, however, was hampered by its short shelf-life. Now that fluoride-based compounds have become available and florbetapir has been approved by the FDA for in vivo imaging of amyloid, are we ready to use this method for the pre-mortem diagnosis of AD? Are the questions on sensitivity, specificity and cut-off values sufficiently answered?
15:45-16:45
Debate: Is amyloid imaging really helpful in diagnosing AD?
15:45-16:00
16:00-16:15
16:15-16:30
16:30-16:45
Yes: Alexander Drzezga, German
No: Yoram Barak, Israel
Discussion
Commentator: Marwan N. Sabbagh, USA
 
16:45-17:15
Coffee Break
Sesion 24
Movement disorders in sleep
17:15-19:15
 
Chairpersons:
Joachim Krauss, Germany; Zvezdan Pirtošek, Slovenia
Capsule:
Movement disorders in sleep, like REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), present a possible early biomarker for neurodegeneration. RBD and RLS are among the most frequent movement disorders. Polysomnography is a time consuming and expensive method, but has been required to diagnose RBD, whereas RLS is defined by clinical criteria. Many scales have been developed, some of them validated, for both RBD and RLS. Can we abstain from expensive sleep studies and use history and scales?
17:15-18:15
Debate: Are sleep questionnaires a substitute for polysomnography in evaluating patients with movement disorders
17:15-17:30
17:30-17:45
17:45-18:00
18:00-18:15
Yes: Claudia Trenkwalder, Germany
No: Birgit Hӧgl, Austria
Discussion
Commentator: Heinz Reichmann, Germany
 
Capsule:

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a standard ajunctive therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, when to apply DBS for PD has been controversial.  In this debate, the participants will examine the risks and benefits or early application of DBS for PD versus only applying DBS when the response to existing drugs is unsatisfacory

18:15-19:15
Debate: When to introduce deep brain stimulation in PD?
18:15-18:30 Early: Devin Binder, USA
18:30-18:45 Only when the response to existing drugs is unsatisfactory: Dirk Dressler, Germany
18:45-19:00
19:00-1915
Discussion
Commentator: Daniel Truong, USA
 
19:15 Poster Awards & Closing Ceremony, Hall A
 
Saturday, May 10th
Headache
Section Heads - Stefan Evers, Germany & Alan Rapoport, USA
07:00-07:45
Guided E-poster tour #2 - Headache & Pain
Tour Guides: Zaza Katsarava, Germany; János Tajti, Hungary
Session 25 Molecules in headache and sleep
08:00-10:00
 
Chairpersons:
János Tajti, Hungary; Magda Wysocka-Bakowska, Poland
Capsule: CGRP plays a crucial role in migraine pathophysiology. CGRP antagonists are efficacious but have not done well in clinical development. CGRP antibodies are new promising molecules for headache treatment
08:00-09:00 Debate: CGRP antibodies will become the treatment of choice for chronic migraine
08:00-08:15
08:15-08:30
08:30-08:45
08:45-19:00
Pro: Lars Edvinsson, Sweden
Con: Karl Messlinger, Germany
Discussion
Commentator: Uwe Reuter, Germany
 
Capsule: Orexins are involved in sleep disorders and probably also in headache disorders such as cluster headache. New orexin modulators are emerging
09:00-10:00 Debate: Orexin modulators are critical for treating insomnia
09:00-09:15
09:15-09:30
09:30-09:45
09:45-10:00
Pro: Marcelo Bigal, USA
Con: Hans Hamburger, The Netherlands
Discussion
Commentator: Alan Rapoport, USA
 
10:00-10:30
Coffee Break
Session 26 Headache trials
10:30-12:30
 
Chairpersons

George Chakhava, Georgia; Jose Miguel Lainez, Spain

Capsule: In the last years, several new drugs for migraine treatment have been investigated in clinical trials. However, there is no new drug coming on the market in the next years
10:30-11:30 Debate: Innovative headache treatments will be better than what we currently have
10:30-10:45
10:45-11:00
11:00-11:15
11:15-11:30
Pro: Uwe Reuter, Germany
Con: Zaza Katsarava, Germany
Discussion
Commentator: Elliott Gross, USA
 
Capsule: It is questioned from an ethical point of view whether placebo control should be included in headache trials when efficacious treatments are available
11:30-12:30 Debate: The use of placebo is essential in headache trials
11:30-11:45
11:45-12:00
12:00-12:15
12:15-12:30
Yes: Randall Weeks, USA
No: Peter Kropp, Germany
Discussion
Commentator: Marcelo Bigal, USA
 
12:30-12:45 Break
 
12:45-13:45
Plenary lectures, Hall A
12:45-13:10
13:10-13:15
Stroke treatment, 2014
Werner Hacke, Germany
Discussion
13:15-13:40
13:40-13:45
Personalized treatment of neurological diseases
Discussion
13:45-14:45
Lunch Break
13:45-14:45
Industry-Supported Meet the Expert - Lunch session
Pre-registration to this session is required
Click here for the full meet the expert
Session 27 Treatment of chronic headache
14:45-16:45
 
Chairpersons:
Claire Moret-Chalmin, France; Lars Neeb, Germany
Capsule: Stimulation procedures have been developed recently to treat refractory migraine and cluster headache. The clinical value of these procedures is still being investigated
14:45-15:45 Debate: Electrical stimulation is an important advance in the treatment of headache disorders?
14:45-15:00
15:00-15:15
15:15-15:30
15:30-15:45
Yes: Arne May, Germany
No: László Vécsei, Hungary
Discussion
Commentator: Karl Messlinger, Germany
 
Capsule: Medication and various psychological therapies are used in chronic headache disorder. Which therapy is best?
15:45-16:45 Debate: Behavioral therapy if sufficient for the treatment of migraine and chronic migraine
15:45-16:00
16:00-16:15
16:15-16:30
16:30-16:45
Pro: Randall Weeks, USA
Con: Hans-Christoph Diener, Germany
Discussion
Commentator: Alan Rapoport, USA
 
16:30-17:00
Coffee Break
Session 28 The meaning of migraine for life ...
17:15-19:15
 
Chairpersons:
Uwe Reuter, Germany; Vladimir Romanenko, Ukraine
Capsule: It has clearly been shown that migraine with aura increases the risk of vascular disorders. However, the impact of this increased risk on the daily life of migraineurs is still unclear
17:15-18:15 Debate: Is migraine a critical risk factor in stroke
17:15-17:30
17:30-17:45
17:45-18:00
18:00-18:15
Pro: László Vécsei, Hungary
Con: Hans-Christoph Diener, Germany
Discussion
Commentator: Stefan Evers, Germany
 
Capsule: The cognitive changes and comorbidities associated with migraine cause clinical problems but may have some beneficial effect
18:15-19:15 Debate: Migraine confers an evolutionary advantage to migraineurs?
18:15-18:30
18:30-18:45
18:45-19:00
19:00-19:15
Yes: Peter Kropp, Germany
No: Jack Schim, USA abstract by Morris Levin
Discussion
Commentator: Lars Edvinsson, Sweden
 
19:15 Poster Awards & Closing Ceremony, Hall A
 
Saturday, May 10th
Rehabilitation / Neuroprotection
Rehabilitation Section Heads: Volker Hömberg, Germany & Dafin Muresanu, Romania
07:00-07:45
Guided E-poster tour #2 - Rehabilitation and Neuro-psychiatry
Tour Guides: Stephanie Clarke, Switzerland; Jerzy Leszek, Poland
Session 29 Rehabilitation
08:00-10:00
 
Chairpersons:

Peter Feldschreiber, UK; Alla Guekht, Russia

Capsule: In this debate two major avenues to influence neural recovery and reorganization will be contrasted: Multiple neuromodulatory strategies have been proven to influence motor or cognitive processes, especially learning, by use of noninvasive forms of peripheral somatosensory stimulation by electrical currents, partial or whole body vibration as well as direct brain stimulation by transcranial DC or magnetic stimuli. In contrast, pharmacological neuromodulation uses monomodal or more and more multimodal drugs to influence brain plasticity reorganization. It is unclear which approach is superior and how far combinations of these two different approaches might work
08:00-09:00 Debate: Neuromodulation by non-invasive methods in neurorehabilitation
08:00-08:15
08:15-08:30
08:30-08:45
08:45-09:00
Pharmacological strategy: Dafin Muresanu, Romania
Non-pharmacological strategy: Volker Hömberg, Germany
Discussion
Commentator: Heinrich Binder, Austria
 
Capsule: The ideal way for rehabilitation in conditions of irreversible neuronal loss would be the replacement of the affected tissue e.g. by transplantation of autologous or heterologous brain cell material e.g. stem cell implants. In contrast to such a direct "biological" repair, indirect "training" methods are used to influence brain self-reorganization. This approach is more and more supported by refined technological systems such as therapy robots which allow treatment in early stages after stroke and TBI and hence open new therapeutic windows. It is unclear which approach is the most promising
09:00-10:00 Debate: Best future strategies for neurorehabilitation
09:00-09:15
09:15-09:30
09:30-09:45
09:45-10:00
Stem cell therapy: Eva Feldman, USA
Neurotechnology: Volker Hömberg, Germany
Discussion
Commentator: Stephanie Clarke, Switzerland
 
10:00-10:30
Coffee Break
Session 30 Traumatic brain injury (TBI)
10:30-12:30
 
Chairpersons:
Leontino Battistin, Italy; Heinrich Binder, Austria
Capsule: In the dawn of scientific neurology, Hughlings Jackson defined epilepsy as a "tendency to have recurrent seizures." Hence the use of antiepileptic drugs should be reserved for conditions with recurrent seizures. On the other hand, it is known that in certain conditions, such as after moderate or severe TBI, the brain has an increased tendency to react with seizure activity. Therefore it is unclear if under such circumstances antiepileptic treatment should be installed immediately after the first seizure to prevent further possible epileptic activity
10:30-11:30 Debate: Do we have to treat post-traumatic seizures following the first seizure?
10:30-10:45
10:45-11:00
11:00-11:15
11:15-11:30
Yes: Alla Guekht, Russia
No: Péter Halász, Hungary
Discussion
Commentator: Volker Hömberg, Germany
 
Capsule: TBI as a heterogeneous condition with various underlying pathology and pathophysiology, poses complicated methodological challenges in respect to data collection, outcome-assessment and design of clinical trials. Although a wide variety of different kinds of therapy, including neuroprotective agents with a theoretical high-potential for efficacy have been developed over the past thirty years, not a single TBI trial with a traditional design has succeeded to demonstrate statistical significance on e.g. such neuroprotective agents. The risk exists that some possible effetive therapies may have failed due to the use of methods not sensitive enough to reveal effectiveness. Almost all the inconclusive studies used a single outcome measure approach. Recent recommendations highlight the necessary of a multidimensional approach including neurophysical disablilities and disturbances of mental functioning. Are there concepts for a new start in TBI clinical research?
11:30-12:30 Debate: Strategies to improve TBI management
11:30-11:45
11:45-12:00
12:00-12:15
12:15-12:30
New approaches: Johannes C. Vester, Germany
Classic approaches: Bogdan O. Popescu, Romania
Discussion
Commentator: Volker Hömberg, Germany
 
12:30-12:45 Break
12:45-13:45
Plenary lectures, Hall A
12:45-13:10
13:10-13:15
Stroke treatment, 2014
Werner Hacke, Germany
Discussion
13:15-13:40
13:40-13:45
Personalized treatment of neurological diseases
Discussion
13:45-14:45
Lunch Break
13:45-14:45
Industry-Supported Meet the Expert - Lunch session
Pre-registration to this session is required
Click here for the full meet the expert
 
Session 31 Society for the Study of Neuroprotection and Neuroplasticity (SSNN) Symposium
14:45-16:45
 
Chairpersons:
Natan Bornstein, Israel; Dafin Muresanu, Romania
14:45-15:15
Lecture: Biological molecules and pharmacological support in brain protection and recovery
 
Dafin Muresanu, Romania
15:15-15:45 Lecture: Post stroke cognitive impairment – current status and future therapeutic challenges
 
Natan Bornstein, Israel
15:45-16:15 Lecture: Early rehabilitation after stroke. CARS trials
 
Volker Hӧmberg, Germany
16:15-16:45 Lecture: Diabetic neuropathy: One disease or two?
 
Eva Feldman, USA
16:45-17:15
Coffee Break
Session 32 Neuroprotection
17:15-19:15  
Chairpersons: Andreas Kupsch, Germany; Jerzy Leszek, Poland
 
Capsule: Significant investment has been done so far in attempt to identify interventions helping to neuroprotection, but all have failed. Is this likely to continue?
17:15-18:15
Debate: Is there a future for neuroprotection in acute ischemic stroke (AIS)
17:15-17:30
17:30-17:45
17:45-18:00
18:00-18:15
Yes: Natan Bornstein, Israel
No: László Csiba, Hungary  
Discussion
Commentator: Dafin Muresanu, Romania
 
18:15-18:35 Lecture: Complex regional pain syndrome: A diagnostic and treatment challenge
 
18:35-18:55 Lecture: From coagulation to neuroscience
 
Joab Chapman, Israel
18:55-19:15
Discussion time
19:15
Poster Awards & Closing Ceremony, Hall A